PROCO http://www.procoproducts.com The Expansion Joint and Check Valve People Tue, 16 Jan 2018 17:13:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.2 Expansion Joints for Combined Cycle Plants http://www.procoproducts.com/expansion-joints-combined-cycle-power-plants/ Wed, 08 Nov 2017 21:45:58 +0000 http://www.procoproducts.com/?p=4412 Author: Rob Coffee, Vice President, Sales & Marketing, Proco Products, Inc. Now that you know the basic concepts behind how a combined cycle power plant works, let’s talk about some of the expansion joints you might find in a combined cycle power plant. The majority of expansion joints in a combined cycle power plant will Continue reading

The post Expansion Joints for Combined Cycle Plants appeared first on PROCO.

]]>
Author: Rob Coffee, Vice President, Sales & Marketing, Proco Products, Inc.

Now that you know the basic concepts behind how a combined cycle power plant works, let’s talk about some of the expansion joints you might find in a combined cycle power plant.

The majority of expansion joints in a combined cycle power plant will be rubber spool-type expansion joints. Many of these rubber expansion joints are used in the pumping system that pushes circulating water throughout the facility. Circulating water pumps pull water into the combined cycle power plant where it is boiled to create steam, which then turns the turbine (as you saw in the video from GE). The steam returns to the condenser to transform back into water which is then recirculated. The rubber expansion joints will be found near the recirculating water pumps, the condensate pumps and the condenser connections. 

Water is also pumped to the cooling towers, where you will find rubber expansion joints at the inlet to the cooling tower cell. There tends to be multiple cells to every cooling tower, so you will typically find an expansion joint at the connection from the header pipe, or the pipe coming out of the ground, into the cooling tower. Expansion joints can also be found between the riser pipes and the cooling tower. 

There are some areas where the water does not meet certain quality standards and it must be treated prior to entering a combined cycle power generating facility. In order to de-ionize the water, it must first be sent to a water demineralization building for purification. These “demist” buildings will contain several expansion joints in the tertiary pumping systems as well as pumping systems that may be working in tandem with the cooling tower. 

You will find penetration seal expansion joints at the top and bottom of the heat steam recovery generator (HSRG) because the pipes that extend from the top and bottom of the HSRG grow from thermal expansion. In some cases, there may be duct-type expansion joints between the steam drum and the top of the HSRG, in addition to a ducting joint that connects the HSRG to the stack. Off of the HSRG steam drum, you will find down-corner expansion joints, which are most commonly a metal bellows style expansion joint. 

Metal bellows expansion joints are also sometimes used for the gas turbine exhaust. Some combined cycle power generating plants may have a turbine crossover expansion joint off the steam generator. In these systems, there is a gas turbine that is fueled by natural gas. The gas turbine produces the steam to turn the steam turbine generator and create the electricity, so there is a turbine crossover that takes the steam and throws it back into the condenser to start the process all over again. Metal bellows expansion joins will be found in this case at the steam turbine, at the crossover and at the turbine to condenser neck.

Not every combined cycle systems is the same. Some use a lot of water in their processes; some use a cooling tower as part of their system (which is where you will find the majority of the expansion joints). Some are what are known as “cross-flow”, where a combination of air and water is used (example: a combined cycle power plant that has an air cool condenser, but still also uses water in their process). Other plants may be completely air-cooled, so instead of a cooling tower with water, they rely on big cooling fans – this happens in areas where a power plant is needed, but where less water is available, so they have to implement the air-cooled design. 

There are rubber expansion joints in the pumps and piping systems all around the cooling tower. The expansion joints between the turbine and the HSRG in the ducting system can be fabric as well as metal. There are also expansion joints in the various heat exchangers at the plant for other systems, and many plants also have chiller systems used for turbine inlet cooling (see figure 1 below). All of these parts below will require expansion joints. 

If you have any questions about expansion joints for combined cycle plants, feel free to email robc@procoproducts.com to learn more. 

combined cycle power plants

Figure 1: TIAC Chiller System Overview

This article was originally featured on www.empoweringpumps.com

The post Expansion Joints for Combined Cycle Plants appeared first on PROCO.

]]>
New Hire for Industrial Distribution Sales Manager http://www.procoproducts.com/new-hire-industrial-distribution-sales-manager/ Tue, 05 Sep 2017 19:44:18 +0000 http://www.procoproducts.com/?p=4388 Proco is pleased to announce that we have a new member on our team. Eric Blazej has accepted the position as our new Industrial Distribution Sales Manager. Eric comes to us from The Metraflex Company, an expansion joint company in the HVAC industry. Eric has spent several years in the Metraflex customer service department working Continue reading

The post New Hire for Industrial Distribution Sales Manager appeared first on PROCO.

]]>
Proco is pleased to announce that we have a new member on our team. Eric Blazej has accepted the position as our new Industrial Distribution Sales Manager. Eric comes to us from The Metraflex Company, an expansion joint company in the HVAC industry. Eric has spent several years in the Metraflex customer service department working on projects with their agent base. Eric is looking forward to working in an outside sales capacity and will undoubtedly excel in his new role for Proco Products, Inc. 

Eric will be based in Chicago, Illinois working out of his home. Eric will travel for Proco a minimum of two weeks per month working with our outside “distributor” sales representatives and/or our industrial distribution base. 

Please join us in welcoming Eric to the Proco Family! 

Industrial Distribution Sales Manager

 

The post New Hire for Industrial Distribution Sales Manager appeared first on PROCO.

]]>
What is a Low Headloss In-Line Rubber Duckbill Check Valve? http://www.procoproducts.com/low-headloss-inline-rubber-check-valve/ Wed, 02 Aug 2017 15:05:26 +0000 http://www.procoproducts.com/?p=4337 Authors: Cal Hayes, General Manager – Waterworks Division and Mike Lassas, Vice President – Administration Low headloss in-line rubber check valves are a very specific type of check valve that many municipal design engineers are specifying across residential and commercial areas of the United States. So what is it and how is it used in Continue reading

The post What is a Low Headloss In-Line Rubber Duckbill Check Valve? appeared first on PROCO.

]]>
Authors: Cal Hayes, General Manager – Waterworks Division and Mike Lassas, Vice President – Administration

Low Headloss In-Line Rubber Check valve

Low headloss in-line rubber check valves are a very specific type of check valve that many municipal design engineers are specifying across residential and commercial areas of the United States. So what is it and how is it used in municipal pumping applications? Let’s break it down…

Low Headloss  – Headloss is essentially the amount of energy which is lost as a result of resistance to flow. A certain amount of energy is required to move a given volume of liquid through a pipe, and as that liquid moves through the pipe, friction causes the resistance to flow and subsequent loss of energy. Low headloss check valves are designed to exhibit low headloss characteristics (or low loss of energy) during operation, which is important for municipal design engineers to know as these valve headloss values affect pump selection. A design engineer has to know how much headloss is estimated to occur as the liquid moves through the check valve in order to select the right pump to push fluid through that piping system.    

In-Line – An “in-line” style check valve is usually installed at the inlet or discharge end of a piping system. Typically, when you install an in-line check valve in a piping system, 40% to 60% of the flow is constricted (if you have a 6-inch line, for example, flow is only moving through 3 or 4 inches); so in some cases, municipal design engineers may need their in-line check valves to have a full port design.

Rubber Duckbill – Rubber duckbill check valves have been around since the 1980s and are well known in the U.S. as they were designed to replace traditional swing gate or flap gate type check valves. Ideal for water and wastewater systems, rubber duckbill check valves are elastomeric, and therefore, have the capacity  to flex around objects that might get caught up in the water and wastewater stream, such as beer bottles and other kinds of debris. Rubber duckbill check valves, which are less likely to freeze or deform, are designed to withstand most types of municipally pumped media.

Check Valve – A check valve is installed in a pumping system to prevent the backward flow of the pumped material or to prevent backflow from outfall discharge areas. There are many types of check valves, and different ones are used in various types of municipal applications. Commonly used to control back pressures from sewage plants, outfalls and tidal operations, in-line rubber duckbill check valves are fully passive flow devices which do not require maintenance or any outside sources of power or manual assistance to operate.

Putting it All Together to Meet the Need            

There are some municipal applications that require ZERO backflow – applications where are low headloss in-line rubber duckbill check valve is the most ideal solution. The applications include Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs), Sanitary Sewer Overflows and storm water outfalls.

Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs):

A combined sewer is a sewage collection system of pipe and tunnels designed to also collect surface runoff. Combined sewers can cause serious water pollution problems during combined sewer overflow (CSO) events when wet weather flows exceed the sewage treatment plant capacity.                                                                                                      

Sanitary Sewer Overflow:

A condition in which untreated sewage is discharged from a sanitary sewer into the environment prior to reaching sewage treatment facilities.

Outfalls:      

An outfall is the discharge point of a wastes stream into a body of water; alternatively, it may be the outlet of a river, drain or sewer where it discharges into a body of water.

If you want to learn more about low headloss in-line rubber  check valves, check out the ProFlex Style 790 Low Headloss In-Line Rubber Check Valve which was recently flow tested at the Utah Water Research Laboratory in June 2017. You may also contact Mike Lassas or Cal Hayes to learn more or to request flow data (which is now available for sizes up to 96 inches).                                                                             

Low Headloss In-Line Rubber Check valve

Flow testing of the Style 790 Low Headloss In-Line Rubber Check Valve at the Utah Water Research Laboratory in June 2017

 

The post What is a Low Headloss In-Line Rubber Duckbill Check Valve? appeared first on PROCO.

]]>
Case Study: Eliminating Severe Water Hammer Issues w/Proco ProFlex™ Style 750 http://www.procoproducts.com/eliminating-water-hammer/ Wed, 28 Jun 2017 20:17:24 +0000 http://www.procoproducts.com/?p=4287 Rubber duckbill design of Proco check valve solves water hammer problems for Town of Boone, N.C. The Jimmy Smith Wastewater Treatment Plant (WTP) is located in Boone, N.C., a town of 17,000 that sits at an elevation of about 3,300 ft. With a permitted capacity of 4.82 million gpd, the plant serves Boone as well Continue reading

The post Case Study: Eliminating Severe Water Hammer Issues w/Proco ProFlex™ Style 750 appeared first on PROCO.

]]>
Rubber duckbill design of Proco check valve solves water hammer problems for Town of Boone, N.C.

The Jimmy Smith Wastewater Treatment Plant (WTP) is located in Boone, N.C., a town of 17,000 that sits at an elevation of about 3,300 ft. With a permitted capacity of 4.82 million gpd, the plant serves Boone as well as the Appalachian State College and a few businesses outside of the city’s limits. Since it opened in the 1990’s, however, the plant has experienced water hammer issues, according to plant maintenance technician Darrell Moody.

water hammer

Project: Check Valve replacement and Water Hammer Elimination
Location: Jimmy Smith Water Treatment Plant
Owner: Town of Boone, N.C.
Supplier: Valve & Pump Specialties, Inc.

The three influent pumps at the plant feed into a common header that goes uphill for about  80 ft before discharging into an aeration basin. The plant uses traditional 16-in. AWWA swing check valves, which have experienced sometimes violent pressure resulting in water hammer and equipment damage. 

The elevation and pump dead head pressure creates a “kind of perfect storm,” said Ryan Cain, an outside sales associate at Valve & Pump Specialties, Inc. in Wilmington, N.C. The company serves as a manufacturer’s representative for Proco Products, Inc. “The extent of the problem is magnified because the elevation is so high. You can have head pressure coming back and a pump coming on a the same time, causing a pretty incredible situation,” said Cain. 

A severe water hammer event in the late 1990’s ruptured the piping and caused the pump room to be filled with raw sewage, said Cain. Because of this, large structural beams were added in the plant’s pump room to connect the header pipe to the walls. In February 2013, the Jimmy Smith WTP had just undergone the rebuilding of all three of its influent pumps when another violent water hammer event occurred, destroying one of the check valves, said Cain. The valve disc had slammed so violently that it wrenched the seat ring from the valve body, warping the previously-round bronze seat ring into an egg shape. 

water hammer style 750

Prior to installation of the ProFlex Style 750 valve, water hammer had been a consistent and severe issue with this header assembly.

Eliminating Water Hammer

Needing to find a new check valve to replace the one that was destroyed, Moody contacted Cain. Cain recommended the Proco ProFlex™ Style 750, which eliminates water hammer issues with its rubber duckbill design. “Rubber does a lot to absorb energy,” he said. “Even if you have a high elevation discharging reverse flow and another pump in the header system coming on, you’re forcing two rubber faces to come back to one another rather than slamming metal on metal.”

Since a check valve needs to be sized properly to the piping systems, Proco recorded information such as the flow velocity and pump dead head pressure to ensure a properly engineered valve. The Proco ProFlex™ Style 750 needed to meet several requirements for this project. Since the valve is one of the three on a common header, the Proco ProFlex™ Style 750 needed to withstand both instantaneous surges of back pressure as well as pump dead head pressure. Due to the abrasive nature of raw sewage, Proco determined the check valve needed a rubber lining to extend its wear life. Also, per the client’s request, the check valve had to match the face-to-face dimension of the existing check valve. 

Shown here is the rubber valve inside the metal housing, viewed from the discharge end of the valve.

Proco presented a 16-in. Proco ProFlex™ Style 750 to Boone that met those requirements, and also included flush ports that allow for the cleaning of solids collection without an operator having to directly handle the sewage. Since the check valve is mounted to a rubber expansion joint on the discharge side of the check valve, Proco also included a structural support for the existing expansion joint. 

New Valve Results

The new Proco valve was installed on May 13, 2013, and the pump’s water hammer issues have since been eliminated. Moody admitted that initially, some of the plant’s operators were skeptical of the new check valve’s design. “A lot of the operators wondered if the duckbill design would work,” he said. “When they listened to when the pump shut off and how quiet it was, they were quiet after that.”

Shown here is the extensive bracing (light gray beams and saddles connecting the piping to the wall) that had been installed after a catastrophic water hammer event had occurred 10 years or so prior to the new valve installation.

The other two pumps at Jimmy Smith WTP still have some water hammer issues, but Moody has a plan for when they need to be replaced. “We’ll go back to Proco no matter what,” he said. “There’s nothing mechanical on (the ProFlex™ Style 750). There’s nothing to check, nothing to grease and nothing to worry about. As far as simplicity goes, it’s great for a maintenance tech like me.” And most importantly, the ProFlex™ valves provide silence. 

The post Case Study: Eliminating Severe Water Hammer Issues w/Proco ProFlex™ Style 750 appeared first on PROCO.

]]>
Connecting Spherical-Type Expansion Joints to Butterfly and/or Wafer Valves http://www.procoproducts.com/connecting-spherical-type-expansion-joints/ Mon, 15 May 2017 21:27:15 +0000 http://www.procoproducts.com/?p=4248 Connecting spherical-type expansion joints to butterfly valves and/or wafer check valves can lead to damage or premature failure of your expansion joints. Proco Products, Inc. recommends installing spherical-type expansion joints against flat face flanges when at all possible.  A butterfly valve disc may come in contact with the I.D. of the mating spherical expansion joint Continue reading

The post Connecting Spherical-Type Expansion Joints to Butterfly and/or Wafer Valves appeared first on PROCO.

]]>
Connecting spherical-type expansion joints to butterfly valves and/or wafer check valves can lead to damage or premature failure of your expansion joints. Proco Products, Inc. recommends installing spherical-type expansion joints against flat face flanges when at all possible. 

A butterfly valve disc may come in contact with the I.D. of the mating spherical expansion joint body as it opens and rubs or cuts into the rubber element causing premature failure. Reduced sealing surfaces of butterfly or wafer check valves used in conjunction with beaded end spherical-type expansion joints connection can leak or fail during surge conditions. 

Please review Proco Products, Inc. Installation Instructions for more information. 

 

spherical-type expansion joints

spherical-type expansion joints

The post Connecting Spherical-Type Expansion Joints to Butterfly and/or Wafer Valves appeared first on PROCO.

]]>
Tips for Inspecting Expansion Joints in Marine Applications http://www.procoproducts.com/inspecting-expansion-joints-in-marine-applications/ Thu, 11 May 2017 21:07:35 +0000 http://www.procoproducts.com/?p=4204 Author: Patrick Booth, Proco Products, Inc. Date of Publication: April 17,2017 Published Online: http://www.empoweringpumps.com/proco-inspecting-expansion-joints-marine/ Wherever there are pumping systems, there are expansion joints. Expansion joints are used in many marine applications, including but not limited to ballast systems, circulating engine water and main propulsion engines. Marine and aquatic conditions are unique require equipment that can Continue reading

The post Tips for Inspecting Expansion Joints in Marine Applications appeared first on PROCO.

]]>
Author: Patrick Booth, Proco Products, Inc.

Date of Publication: April 17,2017

Published Online: http://www.empoweringpumps.com/proco-inspecting-expansion-joints-marine/

expansion joints in marine applications

Wherever there are pumping systems, there are expansion joints. Expansion joints are used in many marine applications, including but not limited to ballast systems, circulating engine water and main propulsion engines. Marine and aquatic conditions are unique require equipment that can withstand turbulence, wear and corrosion. Even when you have expansion joints that are designed to endure the most rigorous environments, inspecting your expansion joints is an effort all maintenance personnel have to perform to ensure reliability. 

What to Look for When Inspecting Expansion Joints in Marine Applications

Inspectors will typically have their own list of criteria to check, but in general, these are some items to look for when inspecting your expansion joints installed in shipboard and shore-based support facilities.

  1. Is there any cracking? Is the outer body/cover showing signs of cracking or is it dry? If the expansion joint has dried out, you may see signs of cracking with fabric exposed, which is a visual indication of degradation that might necessitate replacement. 
  2. Do you see any blisters or separation of the rubber layers from the reinforcing fabric? If the expansion joint looks like it has a bubble or a blister outside of the bellow, then this is  a cause for concern and may warrant replacement of your expansion joint.
  3. Check the metal. What do the expansion joint flanges look like? Are the backing rings or expansion joint flanges rusted? Are they corroded? Are they pitted? Sometimes pitting can occur in applications that transport sea water. Check to make sure that you have an expansion joint with the correct metallurgy. If you see pitting, it could be a sign that you might require a different metal that works better with sea water or whatever chemicals the expansion joint is exposed to. Use this Chemical Guide to find compatible elastomers for your specific application.
  4. Measure the dimensions of the expansion joint in as many places as you can to make sure the dimensions are within the acceptable allowable movement criteria. Take note of the dimensions may allow you to determine if there is an issue with the piping system. Documenting that data will help you determine if the piping needs to be adjusted or if you need an expansion joint with a shorter/longer overall length.
  5. Is the rubber gummy or sticky? Check the condition of the rubber and look for leakage around the flanges, as the rubber can deteriorate. If the rubber feels gummy or sticky, that is a sign that the rubber has degraded. 
  6. Is the expansion joint in the sun? In many shipboard applications, expansion joints are located above deck, where the sun can do damage. The sun will age an expansion joint, so you will want to inspect expansion joints in sunny locations on a more frequent basis.
  7. Look at the health and overall condition of your expansion joint, and remember that replacement criteria for expansion joints varies depending on the specific service condition. 

How often should I inspect my expansion joints?

Your inspection schedule really hinges on the maintenance requirements. Some ships require equipment inspection every 90 days, but the frequency of inspection really depends on each owner or the requirements set forth by the ship manufacturer. Each will have their own rules for how often to check equipment. 

Considerations for Replacement

A general rule of thumb is if expansion joints in critical service are over 5 years old, you should maintain a spare. However, depending on the service conditions an expansion joint, they can last a while – up to 10 years!

Need some help?

If you need help and would like an experienced inspector to perform on-site inspections for your elastomeric piping or ducting (non-metallic) expansion joints, contact Proco Products for support to inspect and evaluate your expansion joints in shipboard and shore-based facilities.

For your shipboard service rubber expansion joint needs, Proco Products can offer the following certificates: ABS, BV, ASTM, U.S. Coast Guard, China Classification Societ, Nippon Kaiji Kyokai, DNV, Lloyd’s Register, along with Germany Lloyds. 

 

Reproduced from an Article Featured on : www.empoweringpumps.com

 

The post Tips for Inspecting Expansion Joints in Marine Applications appeared first on PROCO.

]]>
Case Study: Elastomeric Check Valves Streamline Water Flow in Both Directions at Popular Ski Area http://www.procoproducts.com/case-study-elastomeric-check-valves/ Mon, 24 Apr 2017 21:01:16 +0000 http://www.procoproducts.com/?p=4176 Proco rubber check valves work automatically for pipelines to provide water for snow-making as well as divert excess storm water during spring to fall The Spirit Mountain Recreation Area in Duluth, Minnesota, provides 175 acres for skiing and snowboarding, with 22 runs, a terrain park and freestyle features. The recreation area was created in 1974 and Continue reading

The post Case Study: Elastomeric Check Valves Streamline Water Flow in Both Directions at Popular Ski Area appeared first on PROCO.

]]>
Proco rubber check valves work automatically for pipelines to provide water for snow-making as well as divert excess storm water during spring to fall

Illustrating both intake with a ProFlex™ 780 installed and discharge with a ProFlex™ 710

The Spirit Mountain Recreation Area in Duluth, Minnesota, provides 175 acres for skiing and snowboarding, with 22 runs, a terrain park and freestyle features. The recreation area was created in

Project: Spirit Mountain Water
System Improvements
Location: Duluth, Minn.
Contractor: Ulland Brothers, Inc.
Engineer: SEH, Inc.
Supplier: HD Supply Waterworks

1974 and is an authority of the city, governed by a board of directors that is appointed by the mayor of Duluth. To make sure there’s enough snow during the winter months for guests to enjoy, Spirit mountain has its own snow-making operation. That system requires about 65 million gallons of water each year. Previously, the city had used its drinking water system to make snow, but that was determined to be too expensive, limited in delivery rate and an overall inefficient use of resources. 

In looking for a sustainable water supply for making snow, the city decided to pump water to the recreation area from the St. Louis River. As planning for the pipeline and pumping system began, natural resource managers suggested using the same pipeline to help reduce erosion on a trout stream at the base of the ski area. During spring to late fall, the pipeline would be used to divert a portion of excess storm water generated from the cleared hillside and other development to the St. Louis River. Then in November and December, the pipeline would be used to pump water from the river to Spirit Mountain to make snow. 

Design Challenges

Planning a reversing pipeline presented several design challenges, said Jeff Ledin, Senior Professional Engineer at Short Elliott Hendrickson, Inc. (SEH), the project’s engineer. Water used for making snow is pumped at up to 6,000 gpm. Storm water then flows out of the pipeline at up to 20 cfs. To allow water to flow in both directions, a system using elastomeric check valves was designed. “This pair of valves was a critical component of the project,” Ledin said. “At the end of the pipeline we have to get water to go through a T-fitting in two different directions. In one scenario, water is going out; in another scenario, water is coming in.” 

style 710 check valves

The elastomeric design of the ProFlex™ 710 sealing lips area

At the end of the 36-ft pipeline, the planning team decided to use a Proco ProFlex™ Style 710 duckbill check valve and a Proco ProFlex™ Style 780 wafer style in-line rubber check valve. The valves work automatically, with water flowing out through the Style 710 duckbill check valve and in through the Style 780 check valve. This system was placed in 20 ft of water about 800 ft from the riverbank, making it only accessible to divers and marine construction crews. Using a product that was reliable and required no maintenance was crucial, Ledin said. “It needs to be equipment that’s out of sight and out of mind,” Ledin said. “It takes special effort to get divers to inspect it in the murky water. You have to go through a lot of effort and expense to do inspection or maintenance work.” Few products met the project’s specifications, Ledin said. “In this case, Proco was one of the small number of companies that knew how to make this product correctly,” he said. 

Style 780 check valves

The 48-in. ProFlex™ Style 780 Flanged Rubber Check Valve

Results

The pipeline and pumping project was completed and launched in November 2015. Ledin said he was pleased with the performance of both products. The ProFlex™ Style 710 duckbill check valve “is a great choice, as it is reliably drip tight when needed to prevent back flow,” Ledin said. 

For uphill pumping, the ProFlex™ 780 allows for little headloss when water is drawn in. During uphill pumping, Ledin said the water level in the shorewell drops just 1 ft. Less than half of that loss is attributed to the check valve, with the remainder to the inlet screen, fittings and pipeline. “We were very pleased when we were pulling water in for snow-making to see how little was lost through the wafer valve,” Ledin said. “Everything has been performing very well.” 

 

The post Case Study: Elastomeric Check Valves Streamline Water Flow in Both Directions at Popular Ski Area appeared first on PROCO.

]]>
Install Smarter to Extend Expansion Joint Life http://www.procoproducts.com/joint-selection-install-smarter/ Fri, 24 Mar 2017 16:13:38 +0000 http://www.procoproducts.com/?p=4077 Flexibility and plenty of room for movement ensure successful, reliable sealing. By Rob Coffee – FSA Member The criteria for expansion joint selection for fluid piping applications focuses on the expansion joint’s quality, durability and capabilities. To ensure that the rubber expansion joint’s installation provides optimal service life, operators and maintenance personnel must consider specific Continue reading

The post Install Smarter to Extend Expansion Joint Life appeared first on PROCO.

]]>
Flexibility and plenty of room for movement ensure successful, reliable sealing.

By Rob Coffee – FSA Member

The criteria for expansion joint selection for fluid piping applications focuses on the expansion joint’s quality, durability and capabilities. To ensure that the rubber expansion joint’s installation provides optimal service life, operators and maintenance personnel must consider specific conditions and take a systematic approach. Piping systems require some degree of flexibility. Inadequate flexibility can lead to a catastrophic, potentially life-threatening system failure, making flexibility an important consideration when selecting an expansion joint.

Joint Selection

Rubber expansion joints, which have all-directional movement capability, provide maximum flexibility based on the system requirements. Rubber expansion joints are designed to handle axial, bidirectional lateral, angular and torsional movements of a piping system. 

This movement may be caused by thermal growth or piping misalignment during the construction stage. Rubber expansion joints also absorb vibration that occurs with fluid-borne noise or mechanical equipment rotation. The rubber expansion joint in a fluid piping system provides these benefits in the smallest space possible, keeping the piping system’s size and overall footprint at a minimum. Alternatives, including large pipe loops or metal expansion joints, cannot provide this space-limiting benefit.

joint selection, compromised sealing

Image 1: Compromised sealing caused by a limited sealing area (Images & graphics courtesy of FSA)

With the advent of piping systems that use more high-density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe or installations with lug-style butterfly or wafer check valves, operators must be mindful that rubber expansion joints seal better against full-face flanges (preferably flat-face flanges). For these reasons, reliability of the rubber expansion joint in the piping system is key. When selecting a rubber expansion joint, personnel should review piping and equipment attachments. 

Joint Installation

Sealing spool-type rubber expansion joints against HDPE pipe with metal flanges adapters or pump flanges with lug-style connections can create sealing issues because the sealing area of the joint is reduced significantly.  This sealing difficulty can also be amplified when the rubber expansion joint is installed in an offset condition.

When installing rubber expansion joints HDPE (see Image 1), leakage during operation or surge conditions and failure of the rubber element against the leading edge of the HDPE pipe can occur. Installing a rubber joint to a full-face flange (preferably flat-face) ensures that the seal functions effectively during normal operation and during pressure surges. 

joint selection, effective sealing

Image 2: Effective sealing with a full-face flange

Connecting spherical-type expansion joints to butterfly valves and/or wafer check valves can cause damage or premature failure of expansion joints. The recommended installation of an expansion joint would be against flat-face flanges when possible. A butterfly valve disc may contact the inside diameter of the mating expansion joint body as it opens, rubbing or cutting into to rubber element and potentially causing premature failure. The reduced sealing surfaces of butterfly or wafer check valves, when used in conjunction with beaded-end, spherical-type expansion joints, can cause leakage or failure during surge conditions. For this reason, one or more space flanges should be placed between the expansion joint and the adjoining equipment that might affect the performance of the rubber expansion joint. 

Expansion joint installations are not always straightforward, so plant personnel should consider each application as it relates to the seal. Rubber expansion joints that are installed against full-face flanges (see Image 2) and away from adjacent equipment are more reliable and more tolerant of misalignment, variable operation or pressure surge conditions that may occur in fluid piping systems. 

 

*This article originally appeared in the November 2014 issue of Pumps & Systems Magazine – Sealing Sense Section. Click here to see original posting*

The post Install Smarter to Extend Expansion Joint Life appeared first on PROCO.

]]>
Press Release | IFAT Eurasia 2017 Move to Istanbul Successful http://www.procoproducts.com/ifat-eurasia-2017-press-release/ Fri, 17 Mar 2017 21:15:24 +0000 http://www.procoproducts.com/?p=4115 Proco was honored to have been one of the many exhibitors at this year’s IFAT Eurasia 2017. This event took place February 16th-18th, 2017 in Istanbul, Turkey. The trade fair for environmental technologies was an extremely successful show. Read more in this Press Release released by Messe München GmbH: Press Release: Munich, February 21, 2017 Successful move to Continue reading

The post Press Release | IFAT Eurasia 2017 Move to Istanbul Successful appeared first on PROCO.

]]>
Proco was honored to have been one of the many exhibitors at this year’s IFAT Eurasia 2017. This event took place February 16th-18th, 2017 in Istanbul, Turkey. The trade fair for environmental technologies was an extremely successful show. Read more in this Press Release released by Messe München GmbH:

Press Release: Munich, February 21, 2017

Successful move to Istanbul –  IFAT Eurasia 2017 strengthens its position as Eurasia’s leading trade fair for environmental technologies.

IFAT Eurasia 2017, which took place between February 16 and 18, again demonstrated the continuing importance of Turkey as a hub for the environmental sector in the Eurasian region. The space taken up by this exhibition in the Istanbul Expo Centre (IFM) increased to over 17,000 square meters. A total of 230 exhibitors – representing 413 companies – took part in the second edition of Eurasia’s Leading Trade Fair for Environmental Technologies.

Stefan Rummel, Managing director of Mess München, explains: “The increase in space of almost ten percent shows that the exhibitors, too, are continuing to have confidence and trust in the Eurasian market. Now and in the future, Turkey is an important trading partner and the link between east and west. That is why IFAT Eurasia is of such importance in the long term.”

Satisfied Exhibitors

This view was shared by Münüf Korkmaz, Sales Manager of Buss-SMS-Canzler: “We were very surprised about the amount of interested clients, especially from the waste treatment sector. IFAT Eurasia helped us to successfully introduce our products to the Eurasian environmental market.” Also Gökhan Hasan Gökmen, General Manager at Kärcher Service Ticaret A.S., was very satisfied with the results of the 2017 edition: “IFAT Eurasia serves as both a valuable networking opportunity and a platform for signing business deals. From the business perspective, the event was extremely beneficial. The overall atmosphere and visitor volume of the exhibition exceeded our expectations.” 

The products and solutions showcased at IFAT Eurasia are specifically targeted to the needs of the Eurasian Market. A total of 230 exhibitors from 18 countries took part in this environmental technology fair, making the most of the opportunities it presents for entering new markets. After Turkey, the countries of origin most strongly represented among the exhibitors at the show were Germany, China, Austria, France, Switzerland and Italy ( in this order).

Strong IFAT Brand

Also present in the three exhibition halls were many exhibitors who take part in IFAT in Munich, the world’s leading event for the sector and the parent show of IFAT Eurasia. One of these exhibitors is BHS-Sonthofen. Sales Manager Tobias Steinhauser was delighted: “The IFAT brand stands for professionalism and quality. That is why we followed IFAT to Turkey. The event has really exceeded our expectations.” Looking forward to the next event in two years’ time, Michael Zabelt from NETZSCH Pumpen & Systeme said confidently: “We will definitely be here again in 2019!”

For Osman Bayazit Genç, Managing Director of MMI Eurasia, the move from Ankara to the economic powerhouse of Istanbul has contributed to the positive atmosphere at IFAT Eurasia 2017: “For expanding international business relationships, Istanbul is exactly the right place. The exhibitors have clearly reflected this.” Özden Gözlüklü, Marketing Manager of HA-US, shares this view: “We were already satisfied with the interest in our booth at IFAT Eurasia 2015 in Ankara. But now,  after moving to Istanbul, the show becomes even more effective for the Eurasian market.”

Link Between Three Continents

Among the 11.326 trade visitors from 73 countries were the participants in a range of business delegations, for example from Germany, Greece, Romania and Tunisia. Dr. Makram Ben Hamida, Project Manager Industry, Environment & Energy at the German-Tunisian Chamber of Industry and Trade, led the Tunisian delegation. He was very positive about the event: “For Tunisian countries, IFAT Eurasia is of tremendous significance. It connects the North African region with Asia and Europe like no other trade fair in the sector.”

The trade fair was accompanied by a supporting and conference program featuring high-ranking speakers. Attendees could benefit from insights into current trends and new developments in the environmental sector. Particularly popular was the block of lectures put on by the Turkish Ministry of Environment & Urbanization on themes such as “Zero Waste Approach in Industry” and “Biodrying and Biomethanization Facilities” as well as the sessions by the International Solid Waste Association (ISWA) and its Turkish representative KAKAD. For Prof. Dr. Günay Kocasoy, Head of KAKAD, the Turkish National Committee on Solid Waste and professor at the Bogaziçi University in Istanbul, “the scientific panels and sessions parallel to the exhibition are the highlight of the event. IFAT Eurasia  is not only focused on one subject but covers all  aspects of environmental technologies.” The first “University Challenge Eurasia”, a student competition for the upcoming generation of environmental professionals, took place on day two of IFAT Eurasia 2017.

4,000 Trees for IFAT Eurasia

This year there was no exhibitor night on the evening of the first day of the fair. Instead, the money saved was donated to a reforestation project in Turkey on behalf of all exhibitors. In cooperation with the Turkish Foundation for Combating Soil Erosion, for Reforestation and the Protection of Natural Habitats (TEMA), by the end of the year a total of 4,000 trees will be planted in the province of Balιkesir. “Protecting the environment also means making sacrifices,” explained Osman Bayazit Genç. “With this project we and the exhibitors are together making our symbolic contribution to a greener future!”

The next edition of IFAT Eurasia takes place in Spring 2019 in Istanbul.

Further information: www.ifat-eurasia.com

 

About Messe München:

Messe München is one of the world’s leading trade-show companies. It organizes some 40 trade shows for capital and consumer goods and key high-tech industries in Munich and abroad. Each year more than 30,000 exhibitors and some two million visitors take part in events held at the Messe München trade-fair centre, the ICM – Internationales Congress Center München and the MOC Veranstaltungscenter München. In addition, Messe München organizes trade shows in China, India, Turkey, South Africa and Russia. Messe München has a global business presence with affiliates in Europe, Asia and Africa and more than 60 foreign representatives serving more than 100 countries. 

The post Press Release | IFAT Eurasia 2017 Move to Istanbul Successful appeared first on PROCO.

]]>
FSA Releases Updated Expansion Joints – Piping Technical Handbook http://www.procoproducts.com/fsa-expansion-joints-piping-technical-handbook/ Thu, 16 Mar 2017 18:51:56 +0000 http://www.procoproducts.com/?p=4108 The Fluid Sealing Association (FSA) has just released a complete update of their Expansion Joints – Piping Technical Handbook. Edition 8.0 is based on the latest experience in research, design, and application of piping expansion joints by engineers associated with the Expansion Joint – Piping Division member companies in the FSA.  This publication is available Continue reading

The post FSA Releases Updated Expansion Joints – Piping Technical Handbook appeared first on PROCO.

]]>
The Fluid Sealing Association (FSA) has just released a complete update of their Expansion Joints – Piping Technical Handbook. Edition 8.0 is based on the latest experience in research, design, and application of piping expansion joints by engineers associated with the Expansion Joint – Piping Division member companies in the FSA. 

This publication is available for free download at: http://www.fluidsealing.com/expansion-joints/expansion-joints-publications/

The Expansion-Joints – Piping Technical Handbook, Edition 8.0, includes:

  • Updated renderings of expansion joints and expansion joint layouts.
  • A new section on specialized expansion joints, such as hinged rubber expansion joints, gimbaled rubber joints and pressure balanced expansion joints.
  • A comprehensive list of definitions as they are reviewed within the industry.
  • An expansion joint specification sheet for end users to gather information for customer inquiries to FSA member companies.

The publication is intended to be a reference source of information and data for engineers who design and install piping systems. It provides guidance on design and selection of material and proper installation. 

“The collaboration on the revised hanbook was fantastic. All Expansion-Joint Piping Division members put a lot of effort into the redesign of this handbook,” said Rob Coffee, FSA Vice President. “Special recognition goes to Mr. Gary Eiseman of Dinatecnica for taking the lead on organization of the project.”

The FSA is the leading source for technical information on fluid sealing products. They work to influence, support, educate and raise awareness on products and issues within the industry, develop related standards and provide education in the fluid sealing area. Stay informed on the latest in the industry by checking www.fluidsealing.com frequently. Also be sure to look for the FSA on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Google+.

About the Fluid Sealing Association

Founded in 1933, The FLUID SEALING ASSOCIATION® (FSA) is an international trade association. Member companies are involved in the production and marketing of a wide range of fluid sealing devices primarily targeted to the industrial market. FSA membership includes a number of companies in Europe and Central and South America, but is most heavily concentrated in North America. FSA members account for a majority of the manufacturing capacity for fluid sealing devices in the Americas Market. 

The post FSA Releases Updated Expansion Joints – Piping Technical Handbook appeared first on PROCO.

]]>